MOUNTAIN IN SHADOW – Interview with LOIS PATIÑO: “The man is only a part of a whole… a kind of transitional fade. We are no longer in a waking state, but in a state of reverie in which the ends of the identity vanish.”

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Luciana Dumitru: MOUNTAIN IN SHADOW moves to more abstract images as they unfold, from the more romantic take in the most of your videos. What did you find interesting in this approach?

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OUR DAYS, ABSOLUTELY, HAVE TO BE ENLIGHTENED – Interview with JEAN-GABRIEL PÉRIOT: “I really believe in the power of music as a tool to share emotions. I thought those voices, coming up from a closed place, will be enough to move the audience.”

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Oana Ghera: I know that OUR DAYS, ABSOLUTELY, HAVE TO BE ENLIGHTENED started as a piece of performance art, a concert you worked out with the inmates, but I was curious to know how did you go from that to the experimental documentary that is Our Days…?

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RIVER RITES – Interview with BEN RUSSELL: “I never thought about film as a tool for translation but rather as a way of conjuring, as a means for bringing the unseen out of the shadows and transforming time into a body that we all could understand.”

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Luciana Dumitru: Michel de Certeau writes about the experience of a French travel writer, Jean de Léry, in Tupi, using the term “remainder” for that which couldn’t be translated (into words). In Léry’s case, the overwhelming (subjective) aural and visual pleasures, from the language he couldn’t understand and strange sounds to the visceral experiences of being surrounded by naked bodies. De Certeau says “proximity is presence without possession.”  In your experience of living within the community of Saramaccan animists can you talk about “remainders” that you wanted to pin down? If so, how did film help you? More importantly, what are the “remainders” of this film – RIVER RITES (which is different from the lived experience)?

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NOT EYE – Interview with LAUREN MOFFATT: “Because of the role the camera plays as the conductor of plot in cinema, whoever is holding it essentially has the power.”

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Luciana Dumitru: NOT EYE drew my attention in two directions: looking (and being looked upon) and the gaze in cinema. Some philosophers think of identity as fragmented, non-unitary, non-essentialist, unfixed. In looking and being looked upon, there is an undoing of each other, in a certain sense. You’ve said the character has a problem finding her own identity,“she sees it fragmented” because of the others’ look. Can you say a few words about the relation between the other’s look and the fragmented identity?

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AS THE FLAMES ROSE – Interview with JOÃO RUI GUERRA DA MATA: “As feelings are timeless, cinema should move in the same direction, an acute abstraction of reality that takes you forward while making you look back.”

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Oana Ghera: You were inspired for AS THE FLAMES ROSE by Cocteau’s “La voix humaine”, a monologue written for theater  whose theatricality you expose in various ways, from  revealing its source (by posing the book on the character’s nightstand) to the expressionist play with the lighting (to name just one of your techniques). Yet, it seems to me, AS THE FLAMES ROSE is also a declaration of love for cinema as a medium, what with all the rear projections and TV footage, for artificial as they may be, still manage to expand the enclosed space of the studio in a deeply cinematic way. Where do you stand regarding the long theorised relation between cinema and theater? Where did the influence of the play end and where did that of cinema begin in your creative process? Or are they intertwined? And also regarding the matter of theatricality, how do you relate to Fassbinder’s work?

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A PLACE TO COME – Interview with Flatform – “A Place to Come is the place of paradox on the impossibility of possible worlds.”

Redefining the perception of space as M.C. Escher used to explore it in paintings, A PLACE TO COME reveals the mutual references between a plain description of a place and its concrete demonstration. FLATFORM is a group of artists founded in 2007,  based in Milan and Berlin. Their exhibitions and screenings were present in film festivals like Venice IFF, Rotterdam IFF, Tampere IFF, Nouveau Cinema IFF (Montreal, Canada), Indielisboa IFF (Lisbon, Portugal), etc. Continue reading

MOVING STORIES – Interview with Nicolas Provost – “We are all part of a huge collective film memory.”

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The new work of NICOLAS PROVOST tries to redesign the mentality of mainstream cinema, putting a different light on the narrative filmic process. Over seductive images of a plane flying in the sunset, we hear the off-screen dialogue between a man and a woman. Without ever seeing them, they fully appeal to our imagination. Stock footage is cheaper than shooting new material and is mainly used to fill editing gaps in a film or to illustrate a needed lacking landscape. PROVOST shows that it can have esthetic and cinematic value in itself and can tell a story. In this film, he uses nothing but stock footage of a Boeing plane, flying towards a sunset. Continue reading

INTERNAL DISPLACEMENTS – Interview with Jean Christophe – “Photography gave me a greater range to play with the universe.”

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“Internal Displacements” touchingly explores Transnistria, an enclaved zone, between Moldova and the Ukraine, an unrecognized de facto state situated in the Republic of Moldova. This political entity with its own cultural attributes is not recognized by any country of the international community including Russia where its troops are still deployed. Transnistria has become a region of internal displacement. The music composed by Hans Op de Beeck recreates the pulse of each character and the eclectic rhythm of their space. Continue reading

KONIGSBERG – Interview with Philipp Mayrhofer – “It’s not about giving the right answers but certainly about asking the right questions.”

Imagine

Esthetically enchanting, with a great appetite for retro-pastoral colors and dream-like settings, KONIGSBERG is a charming „existentialist” tragicomedy, reminding of the absurd humor, the melancholic reflexivity and the painterly aesthetics of Roy Anderson’s cinema, however remaining innerly personal, fresh and provoking. Deeply poetized, KONIGSBERG is daringly worth-watching film, with a rare dry humor: a swirling vertigo of the self. Philipp Mayrhofer, the director of the film, was born in South Tyrol, Italy, but is currently based in Vienna and Paris and this is a brief journey into his beliefs, paths and aspirations as a filmmaker. Continue reading